Self-compassion survey - young woman's hand offering a paper heart

Self-Compassion Survey

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When I fail at something important to me I become consumed by feelings of inadequacy.

I try to be understanding and patient towards those aspects of my personality I don’t like.

When something painful happens I try to take a balanced view of the situation.

When I’m feeling down, I tend to feel like most other people are probably happier than I am.

I try to see my failings as part of the human condition.

When I’m going through a very hard time, I give myself the caring and tenderness I need.

When something upsets me I try to keep my emotions in balance.

When I fail at something that’s important to me, I tend to feel alone in my failure.

When I’m feeling down I tend to obsess and fixate on everything that’s wrong.

When I feel inadequate in some way, I try to remind myself that feelings of inadequacy are shared by most people.

I’m disapproving and judgmental about my own flaws and inadequacies.

I’m intolerant and impatient towards those aspects of my personality I don’t like.

Self-Compassion Survey
High Self-Compassion
Your answers indicate a high level of self-compassion.

Forgiving and nurturing yourself can set the stage for better health, relationships, and general well-being. Self-compassion yields a number of benefits, including lower levels of anxiety and depression. Self-compassionate people recognize when they are suffering and are kind to themselves at these times, which reduces their anxiety and related depression.

While some people come by self-compassion naturally, others have to learn it. Luckily, it is a learnable skill.

Here's four ways to foster self-compassion:

1. Comfort your body. Eat something healthy. Lie down and rest your body. Massage your own neck, feet, or hands. Take a walk. Anything you can do to improve how you feel physically gives you a dose of self-compassion.

2. Write a letter to yourself. Describe a situation that caused you to feel pain (a breakup with a lover, a job loss, a poorly received presentation). Write a letter to yourself describing the situation without blaming anyone. Acknowledge your feelings.

3. Give yourself encouragement. If something bad or painful happens to you, think of what you would say to a good friend if the same thing happened to him or her. Direct these compassionate responses toward yourself.

4. Practice mindfulness. This is the nonjudgmental observation of your own thoughts, feelings, and actions, without trying to suppress or deny them. When you look in the mirror and don't like what you see, accept the bad with the good with a compassionate attitude.

Note: The results of this quiz are intended for educational purposes only. If your inner critic is causing undue stress, please consult a mental health professional.

Enter your email address below to receive Free research based tips you can use to improve the quality of your relationship with yourself.

If you want to cultivate more self-compassion, let’s talk about how I might support your efforts!

Moderate Self-Compassion
Your answers indicate a moderate level of self-compassion.

Forgiving and nurturing yourself can set the stage for better health, relationships, and general well-being. Self-compassion yields a number of benefits, including lower levels of anxiety and depression. Self-compassionate people recognize when they are suffering and are kind to themselves at these times, which reduces their anxiety and related depression.

While some people come by self-compassion naturally, others have to learn it. Luckily, it is a learnable skill.

Here's four ways to foster self-compassion:

1. Comfort your body. Eat something healthy. Lie down and rest your body. Massage your own neck, feet, or hands. Take a walk. Anything you can do to improve how you feel physically gives you a dose of self-compassion.

2. Write a letter to yourself. Describe a situation that caused you to feel pain (a breakup with a lover, a job loss, a poorly received presentation). Write a letter to yourself describing the situation without blaming anyone. Acknowledge your feelings.

3. Give yourself encouragement. If something bad or painful happens to you, think of what you would say to a good friend if the same thing happened to him or her. Direct these compassionate responses toward yourself.

4. Practice mindfulness. This is the nonjudgmental observation of your own thoughts, feelings, and actions, without trying to suppress or deny them. When you look in the mirror and don't like what you see, accept the bad with the good with a compassionate attitude.

Note: The results of this quiz are intended for educational purposes only. If your inner critic is causing undue stress, please consult a mental health professional.

Enter your email address below to receive Free research based tips you can use to improve the quality of your relationship with yourself.

If you want to cultivate more self-compassion, let’s talk about how I might support your efforts!

Low Self-Compassion
Your answers indicate a low level of self-compassion.

Forgiving and nurturing yourself can set the stage for better health, relationships, and general well-being. Self-compassion yields a number of benefits, including lower levels of anxiety and depression. Self-compassionate people recognize when they are suffering and are kind to themselves at these times, which reduces their anxiety and related depression.

While some people come by self-compassion naturally, others have to learn it. Luckily, it is a learnable skill.

Here's four ways to foster self-compassion:

1. Comfort your body. Eat something healthy. Lie down and rest your body. Massage your own neck, feet, or hands. Take a walk. Anything you can do to improve how you feel physically gives you a dose of self-compassion.

2. Write a letter to yourself. Describe a situation that caused you to feel pain (a breakup with a lover, a job loss, a poorly received presentation). Write a letter to yourself describing the situation without blaming anyone. Acknowledge your feelings.

3. Give yourself encouragement. If something bad or painful happens to you, think of what you would say to a good friend if the same thing happened to him or her. Direct these compassionate responses toward yourself.

4. Practice mindfulness. This is the nonjudgmental observation of your own thoughts, feelings, and actions, without trying to suppress or deny them. When you look in the mirror and don't like what you see, accept the bad with the good with a compassionate attitude.

Note: The results of this quiz are intended for educational purposes only. If your inner critic is causing undue stress, please consult a mental health professional.

Enter your email address below to receive Free research based tips you can use to improve the quality of your relationship with yourself.

If you want to cultivate more self-compassion, let’s talk about how I might support your efforts!

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